Toyota has announced the introduction of the i-Road

Toyota has announced the introduction of the i-Road personal mobility concept to the “Ha:mo” urban transport system trials. The concept, which made its world debut at 2012 Geneva motor show, will be used alongside existing Toyota COMS personal mobility vehicles from early 2014.
Toyota i-Road
“Ha:mo” is an urban transport system designed to combine all forms of public and private transport with the aim of improving traffic flow and minimising emissions. The system uses electric vehicle car sharing and traffic routing information to ensure the most appropriate form of transportation is used by travellers.
Toyota i-Road
The introduction of Toyota’s i-Road concept is just one action in the expansion of the “Ha:mo” system:
1. Increase in size of electric vehicle fleet
Number of COMS electric vehicles increased from 10 to 100 in October. All COMS vehicles will be fitted with keyless operation.
Number of Yamaha PAS power-assisted bicycles increased from 10 to 100 in October.
Toyota i-Road
2. Introduction of “Ha:mo” smartphone application
The new “Ha:mo” application will have a range of features including:
Suggestion of new route options based upon traffic flow and local vehicle station stocking levels
Reservation of vehicles
Access to local bus timetables
‘Push’ notifications of predicted traffic congestion and weekly traffic congestion forecasts that encourage the use of different roads and transportation methods
Toyota i-Road
3. Increase in number of vehicle stations
Users will be able to rent and return vehicles at 17 new locations from October, an increase from the four currently in operation. These stations will be conveniently located near main train stations and major public facilities.
Toyota i-Road to join Japanese Urban Transport System
Toyota has announced the introduction of the i-Road personal mobility concept to the “Ha:mo” urban transport system trials. The concept, which made its world debut at 2012 Geneva motor show, will be used alongside existing Toyota COMS personal mobility vehicles from early 2014.
“Ha:mo” is an urban transport system designed to combine all forms of public and private transport with the aim of improving traffic flow and minimising emissions. The system uses electric vehicle car sharing and traffic routing information to ensure the most appropriate form of transportation is used by travellers.
4. Trials of Fee-based Sharing Service
From October 1, a fee system will be introduced to the commercial feasibility of the sharing service. Fees will start at 200 yen (around £1.30) for the first 10 minutes and 20 yen (around £0.13) per minute thereafter.
5. Increase in number of Ha:mo members
“Ha:mo” membership is projected to rise from 100 to 1,000 in October, improving the level of data being received from the trial. Trials of Fee-based Sharing Service
SOURCE:

Toyota has announced the introduction of the i-Road

Toyota has announced the introduction of the i-Road personal mobility concept to the “Ha:mo” urban transport system trials. The concept, which made its world debut at 2012 Geneva motor show, will be used alongside existing Toyota COMS personal mobility vehicles from early 2014.

Toyota i-Road

“Ha:mo” is an urban transport system designed to combine all forms of public and private transport with the aim of improving traffic flow and minimising emissions. The system uses electric vehicle car sharing and traffic routing information to ensure the most appropriate form of transportation is used by travellers.

Toyota i-Road

The introduction of Toyota’s i-Road concept is just one action in the expansion of the “Ha:mo” system:

1. Increase in size of electric vehicle fleet

Number of COMS electric vehicles increased from 10 to 100 in October. All COMS vehicles will be fitted with keyless operation.

Number of Yamaha PAS power-assisted bicycles increased from 10 to 100 in October.

Toyota i-Road

2. Introduction of “Ha:mo” smartphone application

The new “Ha:mo” application will have a range of features including:

Suggestion of new route options based upon traffic flow and local vehicle station stocking levels

Reservation of vehicles

Access to local bus timetables

‘Push’ notifications of predicted traffic congestion and weekly traffic congestion forecasts that encourage the use of different roads and transportation methods

Toyota i-Road

3. Increase in number of vehicle stations

Users will be able to rent and return vehicles at 17 new locations from October, an increase from the four currently in operation. These stations will be conveniently located near main train stations and major public facilities.

Toyota i-Road to join Japanese Urban Transport System

Toyota has announced the introduction of the i-Road personal mobility concept to the “Ha:mo” urban transport system trials. The concept, which made its world debut at 2012 Geneva motor show, will be used alongside existing Toyota COMS personal mobility vehicles from early 2014.

“Ha:mo” is an urban transport system designed to combine all forms of public and private transport with the aim of improving traffic flow and minimising emissions. The system uses electric vehicle car sharing and traffic routing information to ensure the most appropriate form of transportation is used by travellers.

4. Trials of Fee-based Sharing Service

From October 1, a fee system will be introduced to the commercial feasibility of the sharing service. Fees will start at 200 yen (around £1.30) for the first 10 minutes and 20 yen (around £0.13) per minute thereafter.

5. Increase in number of Ha:mo members

“Ha:mo” membership is projected to rise from 100 to 1,000 in October, improving the level of data being received from the trial. Trials of Fee-based Sharing Service

 

SOURCE:

Al Ain Japan

Japanese Car

WAKO, Japan — Japan’s killer earthquake-tsunami double punch slammed the country in 2011, knocking out Honda’s operations — and those of its domestic rivals — for months. But the disaster carried a silver lining for Honda that has radically transformed its design department — for the better. Refugee engineers from Honda’s tremor-trashed r&d center in the quake zone initially had no place to work. So they bivouacked to Honda’s design and styling studio just outside of Tokyo. And what happened next stunned insiders, recalls Yoshinori Asahi, global head of interior design for Honda and Acura. 

 

Working elbow to elbow, engineers no longer shot down stylists’ ambitious designs with a dismissive e-mail. And designers more willingly dialed back fantastical drawings after receiving a face-to-face dose of reality from more grounded engineers. 

 

Both sides riffed off each other so well that Honda permanently transferred dozens of engineers to the global design center last spring. Their arrival is crucial as Honda rolls out a new design language to revitalize the brand. 

 

“Before, engineers saw the designs and said ‘So, this is what you want, eh?'” Asahi said. “Now they say, ‘We can’t say no.'”

 

Honda says the overhaul is not only speeding design work but delivering more practical designs that are more cutting-edge, because both sides are more vested in creating something good. 

 

The stakes are high because Honda is introducing the new design language with the third-generation Fit small car that went on sale in September in Japan. Dubbed Exciting H Design, it’s aimed at returning Honda to its sporty roots. 

 

“We have lost a bit of our sportiness while retaining good functionality,” said Toshinobu Minami, global director for exterior design at the carmaker’s two brands. “First, we want sportiness. The thing I want most is to recover our uniqueness.” 

 

The design overhaul of Honda’s product range targets both exterior styling — long criticized for ho-hum looks — and the interior, which was panned as cheap and plasticky in the debut of the latest Civic sedan.

Keywords of the philosophy: High Touch, High Tech and High Tension. 

 

Minami and Asahi adopted the English terms — used even in Japan — for a common language that could be easily grasped in Honda’s far-flung design studios in America, Europe and Asia. 

 

High Touch refers to quality surface treatments and the use of top-grade materials, an obvious rebut to the Civic critics. 

 

High Tension denotes a more muscular stance and a more engaging cockpit. High Tech is realized through the extensive use of touchpad controls on the center stack. Meanwhile, Minami’s new formula for a front look, dubbed Solid Wing Face, blends the grille into the headlamps, creating a more futuristic look. 

 

“Face is important,” Minami said. “But this is a new phase. This time, Honda’s new face integrates the grille and headlights into one. It’s a new era.” 

 

What Honda’s design duo doesn’t want is a new look just to be new. New can quickly become old.

“We used to debate the meaning of new, what is the value of new. But it’s not about old and new,” Asahi says. “It has to be stimulating and emotional.” 

 

A better, more exciting stance is critical, Minami says. Consider the third-generation Fit. It has a much more athletic, chiseled look than the outgoing Fit, which is bubble-shaped. And while both are the same width and height, the new model has a more low-slung stance. 

 

Minami says he achieved this by twisting the car along the sharply creased character line to push the rear wheels out and pinch the rear cabin inward. The line’s sudden downward bend toward the front wheels lends the feeling of a lower front end. 

 

From the front, Minami tries to accentuate a broader tread by spacing fog light cowls low and wide near the corners. Though presented as air intake vents, they are actually dummies that are sealed shut. That is to improve aerodynamics. In fact, the lower mesh grille below the H badge is also part dummy, with about half the mesh openings actually closed. 

 

Improving aerodynamics is another big focus. Minami said the latest Fit achieves a big improvement in drag reduction over the outgoing model, though Honda declines to give specific figures. 

 

Tweaks throughout help cheat the wind: 

 

• Taillamps wrap around the edge of the hatchback. They get a razor-cleaved rim to make a clean break with the wind, but because they are transparent plastic, they mitigate a boxy look.

 

• An all-new platform was designed to keep the car’s undercarriage flat by raising bumps and bulges such as the oil pan.

 

• The A-pillars get special ridges to maximize air flow. The ridges are then integrated into the overall design through creases that stretch down each side of the hood.

 

Watch for those tricks, as well as the rest of the Exciting H package, to be deployed across the Honda line.

Next up: A Fit-based small crossover that will debut at November’s Tokyo Motor Show and go on sale in Japan this year. 

 

A concept version, the Urban SUV Concept, was shown at the Detroit auto show last January. That car, which gets many of the Fit’s styling cues, is very close to the production version, Minami said. 

 

A Fit-based subcompact sedan will follow the crossover. 

 

Involving engineers early in the design process is key. Before, the creative types at the design studio would start a design by dashing off dozens of sketches drawn from the farthest frontiers of their imaginations, Asahi says. 

 

Yet, less attention was paid to whether such designs were realistic. What raw materials are needed? How will it be manufactured? Does a flashy dash panel actually accommodate the air conditioning offered by suppliers? Does the center console sufficiently house the audio display? 

 

“As you do the feasibility studies, the design starts looking worse,” Asahi said. If you don’t start with the big picture, one small miscalculation can throw off the whole package. 

 

Now designers start from materials and functions, and they draw ideas to fit those realities. “It’s a big mind change,” Asahi said. 

 

Stationing engineers inside the design center to consult earlier in the development cycle helps streamline the process. 

 

While it injects a dose or reality for the designers, it also pressures the engineers to try harder to realize more avant-garde ideas. “A good mix is necessary,” Asahi said. 

 

Indeed, last October, the design studio opened the 01 Lounge as a kind of creative retreat for engineers and designers. 

 

There, they chill out on couches, sip cappuccinos or pluck a guitar as they banter back and forth to fire their neurons and find inspiration for that leap from nothingness to an initial idea, the first step in Honda’s 10-stage march to a fixed design. 

 

“Once the factory people start working closely with designers, they become more motivated to actually help bring those designs to life,” Asahi said. “It’s a very powerful support for us.”

 

SOURCE:

Al Ain Japan

 

 

Japanese Car

WAKO, Japan — Japan’s killer earthquake-tsunami double punch slammed the country in 2011, knocking out Honda’s operations — and those of its domestic rivals — for months. But the disaster carried a silver lining for Honda that has radically transformed its design department — for the better. Refugee engineers from Honda’s tremor-trashed r&d center in the quake zone initially had no place to work. So they bivouacked to Honda’s design and styling studio just outside of Tokyo. And what happened next stunned insiders, recalls Yoshinori Asahi, global head of interior design for Honda and Acura. 
Working elbow to elbow, engineers no longer shot down stylists’ ambitious designs with a dismissive e-mail. And designers more willingly dialed back fantastical drawings after receiving a face-to-face dose of reality from more grounded engineers. 
Both sides riffed off each other so well that Honda permanently transferred dozens of engineers to the global design center last spring. Their arrival is crucial as Honda rolls out a new design language to revitalize the brand. 
“Before, engineers saw the designs and said ‘So, this is what you want, eh?'” Asahi said. “Now they say, ‘We can’t say no.'”
Honda says the overhaul is not only speeding design work but delivering more practical designs that are more cutting-edge, because both sides are more vested in creating something good. 
The stakes are high because Honda is introducing the new design language with the third-generation Fit small car that went on sale in September in Japan. Dubbed Exciting H Design, it’s aimed at returning Honda to its sporty roots. 
“We have lost a bit of our sportiness while retaining good functionality,” said Toshinobu Minami, global director for exterior design at the carmaker’s two brands. “First, we want sportiness. The thing I want most is to recover our uniqueness.” 
The design overhaul of Honda’s product range targets both exterior styling — long criticized for ho-hum looks — and the interior, which was panned as cheap and plasticky in the debut of the latest Civic sedan.
Keywords of the philosophy: High Touch, High Tech and High Tension. 
Minami and Asahi adopted the English terms — used even in Japan — for a common language that could be easily grasped in Honda’s far-flung design studios in America, Europe and Asia. 
High Touch refers to quality surface treatments and the use of top-grade materials, an obvious rebut to the Civic critics. 
High Tension denotes a more muscular stance and a more engaging cockpit. High Tech is realized through the extensive use of touchpad controls on the center stack. Meanwhile, Minami’s new formula for a front look, dubbed Solid Wing Face, blends the grille into the headlamps, creating a more futuristic look. 
“Face is important,” Minami said. “But this is a new phase. This time, Honda’s new face integrates the grille and headlights into one. It’s a new era.” 
What Honda’s design duo doesn’t want is a new look just to be new. New can quickly become old.
“We used to debate the meaning of new, what is the value of new. But it’s not about old and new,” Asahi says. “It has to be stimulating and emotional.” 
A better, more exciting stance is critical, Minami says. Consider the third-generation Fit. It has a much more athletic, chiseled look than the outgoing Fit, which is bubble-shaped. And while both are the same width and height, the new model has a more low-slung stance. 
Minami says he achieved this by twisting the car along the sharply creased character line to push the rear wheels out and pinch the rear cabin inward. The line’s sudden downward bend toward the front wheels lends the feeling of a lower front end. 
From the front, Minami tries to accentuate a broader tread by spacing fog light cowls low and wide near the corners. Though presented as air intake vents, they are actually dummies that are sealed shut. That is to improve aerodynamics. In fact, the lower mesh grille below the H badge is also part dummy, with about half the mesh openings actually closed. 
Improving aerodynamics is another big focus. Minami said the latest Fit achieves a big improvement in drag reduction over the outgoing model, though Honda declines to give specific figures. 
Tweaks throughout help cheat the wind: 
• Taillamps wrap around the edge of the hatchback. They get a razor-cleaved rim to make a clean break with the wind, but because they are transparent plastic, they mitigate a boxy look.
• An all-new platform was designed to keep the car’s undercarriage flat by raising bumps and bulges such as the oil pan.
• The A-pillars get special ridges to maximize air flow. The ridges are then integrated into the overall design through creases that stretch down each side of the hood.
Watch for those tricks, as well as the rest of the Exciting H package, to be deployed across the Honda line.
Next up: A Fit-based small crossover that will debut at November’s Tokyo Motor Show and go on sale in Japan this year. 
A concept version, the Urban SUV Concept, was shown at the Detroit auto show last January. That car, which gets many of the Fit’s styling cues, is very close to the production version, Minami said. 
A Fit-based subcompact sedan will follow the crossover. 
Involving engineers early in the design process is key. Before, the creative types at the design studio would start a design by dashing off dozens of sketches drawn from the farthest frontiers of their imaginations, Asahi says. 
Yet, less attention was paid to whether such designs were realistic. What raw materials are needed? How will it be manufactured? Does a flashy dash panel actually accommodate the air conditioning offered by suppliers? Does the center console sufficiently house the audio display? 
“As you do the feasibility studies, the design starts looking worse,” Asahi said. If you don’t start with the big picture, one small miscalculation can throw off the whole package. 
Now designers start from materials and functions, and they draw ideas to fit those realities. “It’s a big mind change,” Asahi said. 
Stationing engineers inside the design center to consult earlier in the development cycle helps streamline the process. 
While it injects a dose or reality for the designers, it also pressures the engineers to try harder to realize more avant-garde ideas. “A good mix is necessary,” Asahi said. 
Indeed, last October, the design studio opened the 01 Lounge as a kind of creative retreat for engineers and designers. 
There, they chill out on couches, sip cappuccinos or pluck a guitar as they banter back and forth to fire their neurons and find inspiration for that leap from nothingness to an initial idea, the first step in Honda’s 10-stage march to a fixed design. 
“Once the factory people start working closely with designers, they become more motivated to actually help bring those designs to life,” Asahi said. “It’s a very powerful support for us.”
SOURCE:

Lexus has released some new details about the 2014 IS F

Lexus has released some new details about the 2014 IS F.
 
Based on the previous-generation model, the 2014 IS F is distinguished by LED fog lights and a new carbon fiber rear spoiler.
 
The cabin also receives some minor upgrades including “F” embossed headrests and black Alcantara trim on the doors and center console. Customers can also order black semi-aniline leather seats or red leather seats with black Alcantara inserts.
 
 2014 Lexus IS F gets detailed
 
As before, power is provided by a 5.0-liter V8 engine that develops 416 bhp (310 kW) and 371 lb-ft (502 Nm) of torque. It is connected to an eight-speed Sport Direct-Shift automatic transmission which enables the 3780 lb (1714 kg) sedan to accelerate from 0-60 mph in 4.6 seconds and hit an electronically-limited top speed of 170 mph (273 km/h).
 
The 2014 Lexus IS F will go on sale shortly and U.S. pricing starts at $63,350 (excluding a $910 destination and handling fee).
 
SOURCE:

Lexus has released some new details about the 2014 IS F.

Lexus has released some new details about the 2014 IS F.
Based on the previous-generation model, the 2014 IS F is distinguished by LED fog lights and a new carbon fiber rear spoiler.
The cabin also receives some minor upgrades including “F” embossed headrests and black Alcantara trim on the doors and center console. Customers can also order black semi-aniline leather seats or red leather seats with black Alcantara inserts.
 2014 Lexus IS F gets detailed
As before, power is provided by a 5.0-liter V8 engine that develops 416 bhp (310 kW) and 371 lb-ft (502 Nm) of torque. It is connected to an eight-speed Sport Direct-Shift automatic transmission which enables the 3780 lb (1714 kg) sedan to accelerate from 0-60 mph in 4.6 seconds and hit an electronically-limited top speed of 170 mph (273 km/h).
The 2014 Lexus IS F will go on sale shortly and U.S. pricing starts at $63,350 (excluding a $910 destination and handling fee).
SOURCE:

Al Ain Japan – Leading Used Car Exporters in Japan

Al Ain japan (pvt) ltd is a Japanese company, which is the leader in Sales and Export of Japanese and European used cars, for more than 16 years, we have shipped our cars to many Countries around the world with some of our most important markets being; Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, Oceania, Asia, the middle East, and North and South America. Our agents and customers around the world offer local support for all of our sales and shipments throughout each region.

 

Al Ain japan (pvt) ltd is a JUMVEA Certified Japanese Car Exporter with a wide variety of quality Japanese Used Cars and Car parts from Japan.

 

 Japanese Used Car Dealers  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are one of the leading online used car dealers in Japan. We have all models of used Japanese Cars. Japanese used cars are exported to all around the region. You can book Japanese used car by logging into http://www.alainjapan.com

We have Japanese used car models that are listed in Al-Ain website with its used car name, used car stock number, used car specification, used car FOB price and complete view of the used car in our site.

We have Used Japanese Car, Japanese used vehicles, Japanese used bus and Japanese used trucks with different categories like Japanese used SUV, Japanese used sedan, Japanese used wagon, Japanese used hatch pack, Japanese used coupe. Al-Ain Japan also has several Used Japanese Car maker like used car Toyota, used car Nissan, used car Subaru,used car Isuzu, used car Suzuki, used car Mazda. you can also see the price and all other details by http://www.alainjapan.com/Stock.aspx

We believe that Japan is the best place to buy used cars mainly because cars in Japan are very carefully maintained and Japanese roads are one of the best in the world.Considering these facts, we can safely assume appreciate the popularity of Japanese used cars as they are economical and an obvious value for money and high quality.The Japanese Government has a very strict car safety system which increases the cost of ownership over time. Any car over five or six years old becomes very expensive to test and service so drivers prefer to buy new cars and put the old one up for auction.

Al Ain japan gives a full support to the customer. We contact for any special offers. We may contact by post, mail, telephone for further business proposals. We have certain terms and conditions and privacy policies. Advance payment must be paid before shipment, full amount to be settled once the Car reached your destination.

 

SOURCE:

 

Al-Ain Japan